Repaired sundial

IMG-20130911-01004This limestone sundial had sheared in two and the rusted iron cramps holding it to the wall at the top were now only barely gripping.

Luckily it was inspected in time and I was able to take it down before it fell. Just as well because it is 4m high above a stable entrance arch.

The two halves were pinned together and jointed using lime. The gnomon (metal style) was restored and repainted by specialists, I cleaned the face of the plate, and discovered and highlighted the markings with non-etching paint. It was replaced using stainless steel fixings.

The white stain is lime and stone from the repair. In a few years this will become less chalky and will no longer be noticeable

Large fireplace

Beginning to restore this large 10 feet wide fireplace in a medieval farmhouse. The structural cracks in the large lintol and cheek stones have been reinforced with structural pins. All cement has been removed from joints. Excavation will follow in order to discover if a hearth remains at a lower level before reconstruction or replacement with a new hearth. This job has been completed in a beautiful transformation. Posts to follow soon.

HallFireplace

Porth-y-Parc, Llwyndu

So pleased to have been involved with Jones & Fraser Ltd in the sympathetic restoration of this ancient barn and cottage Porth-y-Parc Farm on the Llwyndu valley of Sugarloaf mountain near Abergavenny. The masonry was repaired and strengthened with minimal interference in the original structure, and the clients’ use of natural materials throughout has created homes with comfort, atmosphere, and future resilience.

Dismantling and re-siting font St Peters Church, Hereford

This font, comprising some 30 Calne stone (similar to Bath stone) sections required careful dismantling from elsewhere in the building then a highly accurate rebuild in the new position you can see below. A very delicate job since the stone angles crumble just with hand pressure.

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Victorian Mansion: Clock and tower restoration

This clock tower had an eroded Bath stone clock dial. Rolls Royce engineers repaired and remade parts of the derelict clock mechanisms, took the bells away and retuned them, and placed a new bell frame on the tower (the mansion was built by Charles Rolls family). While they were working on the mechanism I repaired the dial and other components, putting new eyes in the ends of the cross, putting reinforcing in to hold the clock face and frame, and cleaned all the stone on the tower including the vinework which was particularly coated in lichen. Needless to say they supplied me with the highest grade stainless steel for all my fixings.

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